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This is a question to any female watchers here, inspired by this comic: sailorswayze.tumblr.com/post/3….

I would like to hear first or second hand stories of sexism you have encountered within fandoms, wether at conventions, among friends, in public or online. Particularly, problems related to males assuming women are so called 'fake nerd girls', or unwanted attention or comments experienced by female cosplayers.
  • Mood: Disgust
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:icondarling:
darling Featured By Owner Dec 1, 2012
There are a lot of good points made in these comments. I'm a female who enjoys playing video games, is majoring in a physical science, plays sports, and also happens to love fashion, wear makeup, and indulge in trash TV. There are a lot of traditionally "male" and "female" hobbies that I participate in frequently, and I've found that can cause just as much trouble.

A lot of girls I know who consider themselves "geeks" or "tomboys" sneer at things they think are too girly. I used to be a bit like this when I was younger, but I now realize it was due to an intrinsic need to conform to other people's ideas of what I should be like if I am going to indulge in traditionally male hobbies. Women face a lot of pressure not only to be feminine, but to not indulge in their femininity if they want to be taken seriously in male-dominated fields.

It is a common joke on campus when a woman shows up for a programming class, or a math class, or an advanced physics course. If she dresses in skirts and wears makeup, she isn't taken seriously in her studies but is still sexually objectified by the men around her; either being white-knighted or approached with condescension.

But if she is not dressed up, she is taken as "one of the guys" and isn't considered a woman. You can have a class full of men with a few female "non-lookers," and guys will still consider this class to be full of men. Those women are pressured to adhere to the hivemind of the male student body, and I've seen them often develop complexes where have their share of insulting other more girly-girls by calling them "attention-whores" or "sluts". If these women do not agree with men in those assessments, she is seen as a killjoy, oversensitive, and a bitch.

It's a frustrating place to be in. I've developed the confidence to assert my own beliefs and opinions, and the men I hang around with often come from privileged perspectives but quickly realize that I do not tolerate any sort of disrespectful behavior. This has lost me friends in the past, but it has also given me the strength to continue being the person I feel I am on the inside, without reserve.

I agree with a lot of different things said for this discussion, I just also wanted to throw this in as well. The most vicious form of sexism today, in my opinion, is the creeping, insidious sexism that is taken for granted as inherent within our society. Men often don't understand how difficult it can be in that position, but women often develop the subconscious view point of "this is just how it is" which results in their own sexist behavior as they deride anyone who steps out of the social norm. A person making a sexist joke is being offensive, but I find it even more offensive when someone decides to invalidate my feelings by acting like it is my fault for not behaving the way they expect me to.
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:iconmustardofdoom:
mustardofdoom Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I haven't directly encountered this because I don't go to these conventions, but as a gamer and a scientist, I can say both areas are guy-heavy.
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:iconmehp:
Mehp Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Darn some of these comments make me kinda sad. All the "get back in the kitchen" type comments are so common I dont really think about them anymore, but they're really not right. I feel lucky that I havent had to put up with too much, but things happen and I usually write it off as internet/irl creeps and move on, but alot of times I almost feel like Im being pushed to say something back and then it becomes a kind of game or something . . . idk it's all messed up. Where's etiquette when you need it?
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012
Any comments in particular? There are so many I am having trouble getting through them :P
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:iconmehp:
Mehp Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Darn I can't find the post to link you, but one girl mentioned, when she plays video games with her bf and his friends it's like she can't just play to have fun. They make comments like "you lost to a girl!" so it's like she's playing to prove herself or something. That's sad to me because the men are oblivious that they are taking some of the fun out of something she enjoys doing and it's not fair that she has to endure that added pressure just because she's a girl.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2012
The men have never been strongly challenged on their attitudes. They probably surround themselves by people who share the same beleifs too. Part of the solution would be rapid bans of anyone using sexist language.
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:icondivinewhirlwind:
DivineWhirlwind Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Student
Yeah seems like a common situation. Especially at anything 'nerdy'.

Usually the men who do this in my opinion are attention seekers. some of my friends look for any reason to slag off girls, some even do it as a cheep form of flirting. it's a sort of childish way of sustaining dominance.

I think deep down a lot of men are afraid of women and they use it as a way of hiding it. Basically it's all pretense. It's done purposefully to make the girl feel something... insecurity or think he's cool. I think the fact girls react to it is giving them what they want. No man in their right mind would turn down the chance to be mates with a hot gamer chick.

Probably not a bulls-eye but that's my interpretation of it anyway. Still not totally sure why lads do it though...

That said here in Ireland it's perfectly normal to slag off your friends or even strangers, usually we call it 'banter', (pretty dark sense of humor over here) but it's more jovial and not meant to be insulting.

And sorry to all the girls out there! we're not all douches, it's an unfortunate irony that those who are the loudest are generally the biggest losers.(I'll keep that last word moderate ;) )
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:iconvladdyboy:
Vladdyboy Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I could not agree with you more. Especially that last paragraph.

I don't discriminate against women, but I slag off to these douchy geek-chique types both male and female, hipsters who, just because they read a comic book, have go out to get a shirt telling people about it.

It's more about self-image than actual legitimate interests. And just because I share the same interests as them that I must automatically become their friend. No, they often turn out to be 1 dimensional characters than actual opinionated human beings, just mindless trend-whores...

As you said, the loudest turn out to be the biggest losers, so imagine a person wearing random videogame/comic book swag walking on the street telling people about about their interests.

One's gender shouldn't even matter anymore, people are too sexually repressed to let that slide.
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:iconhybridgothica:
hybridgothica Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I remember posting a status about the anime GANTZ....and this dude comes out of no where asking "What do YOU know about Gantz?" Like seriously? I know I'm a chick.....but i have a very serious Mental Database of tons of Science Fiction subjects and cyberpunk related anime. Many peoole associate certain genres to a certain sex. It's impossible! :3
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:iconvladdyboy:
Vladdyboy Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I thought that GANTZ was a female-friendly show/manga.

I've only know women ho enjoyed it.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
Ironic, considering the number of female characters in the show.
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:iconheliopteryx:
Heliopteryx Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
As others have said, everyone on the internet is male until proven female. I've never been to the kinds of conventions you mean, or cosplayed, so all I have are stories of sexism in real life or in computer games.

in Minecraft, and some other games, I've had random guys ask me to do questionable things over Skype with them when they find out I am a girl, or ask me if I'll send them pictures of me. These are people whose only interaction with me is to ask if I am a girl, and then ask for things.

On a more positive note, there was one time on a Minecraft server where I lived next to a very widely disliked player (we were on good terms with each other). Someone tracked him down and griefed him. . . .only they griefed my house by mistake because they thought my house was his house. Afterwards, the griefer guy was very sorry, and upon learning that I was female, he was VERY VERY VERY sorry. It was interesting just how much worse he felt (or said he felt) when he learned I was a girl.

In my ninth grade biology class, which was pretty much mandatory (the class itself wasn't, but there was a biology test that was, so everyone took the class in order to be able to pass the test), there was a time when I overheard two guys making fun of my body. I am Asian, and they were talking about how all Asian girls are ugly and have flat chests and asses. They were using me as an example of that opinion. I am fairly certain they didn't know I heard them, so I didn't say anything. Though years have passed, I still wonder how I could have effectively stood up for myself.
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:iconwisecrack-idiots:
Wisecrack-Idiots Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
An interesting topic indeed!

Growing up and even now I was and still am a diehard videogame lover. Xbox, PS2, Wii, GameCube, N64, a variety of handhelds, PC games - I've just about done them all, and almost every genre of gaming, too. Fortunately, my core group of friends is a nice mix of guys and girls who have never once batted an eyelash when it came to my passion for gaming. While I've never directly experienced sexism, I've seen it second-hand.

One game that I love is called Monster Hunter, which can be summed up as pretty much an epic saga of running around and kicking the crap out of giant sea serpents and dragons. Never once in the entire time that I've played online have I ever found another female player. Now, it could be that some girls are using male avatars - I know that when I play I always mess with my looks, and make the character an exaggerated non-representational version of myself. But it's weird that there are so few who openly identify themselves as girls, like yours truly. In the end, we all had a ball ganging up on monsters and flooring them in seconds flat, and it felt like people judged me for my high level of skill as a player instead of my chromosomes, which is something that I appreciate.

Another time I competed in a local Pokemon tournament of twenty+ competitors, and my sister and I were the only two girls. And wouldn't you know it, we placed third and fourth, respectively. No one judged us or looked at us differently, though the obvious lack of other girls made it kind of uncomfortable. I found it odd that there weren't female players there. Was it because there weren't any other girls around who wanted to? Or had they been repelled by some sort of anti-girl aura surrounding the place? I don't know; I never got any sort of rude reception, so I can say. It was probably just who bothered to show up. Either way, it was a jolly good time.

I don't think I've ever been called a "fake nerd." I'd never even heard the term 'til just now. Lol. Though I think that judging anyone on any level or forum by gender is completely nonsensical. I'm better than most of my male friends at videogames, and they don't care! In the end, it just matters if we all have fun doing what we love, right? It seems kind of primeval to make sex a standard, when in the end it boils down to everyone having a great time together. That goes for other things perceived as "masculine"-only.

I suppose that if I ever do encounter a situation like this I'll just ignore any comments and go about my business. I mean no one any harm, and I'd expect similar treatment.

Though reading about others' situations in response to the question you posed has indeed made me grateful of my blessedly low interaction with that sort of stigma. Hopefully people can move beyond that sort of judgment and eliminate female steroetyping - and male! Boy, have I seen some ugly cases of the reverse happening to some of my guy friends.

Anyway, thanks for opening up the discussion. It's an interesting topic, and one that I think deserves some attention in the grand scheme of things. Mind me asking if anything like this has happened to you? Forgive me if I'm being a bit too forward; I'm just curious as to hear your thoughts.
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:icongalaxydestroyer:
GalaxyDestroyer Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
I am quite asexual in that I am not attracted to anything or anyone specifically. I respect and love everyone around me, I am indifferent to whatever discrimination they have toward me or if they are bigoted or racist that is their problem. You cannot change a person, you can however influence them with your actions of how you are. When I see someone being bigoted toward another though I try to intervene. I am truly kind person that treats everyone the same, nice. When a person is evil or mean to me, I hold back my evil. It takes much but I most of the time defeat them with kindness. When I see a fellow man being sexist or racist it mostly hurts my confidence in humanity because as a race we should be above trying to surpass others or hurting others for personal pleasure and self-esteem to feel superior in some way. I believe it is morally wrong and delays us as a race, species, and civilization when a person or a group of persons is/are sexist or racist.

There are passive aggressive things you can do to make a person feel bad and suffer for their bad actions.
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:iconfydbac:
fydbac Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Professional General Artist
I think it's possible it may effect me more than I realize; considering 90% or more of my career interests are in male dominated fields: concept, comics, and tattooing.

I don't like to think my looks have anything to do with it, but I thinks it's important I at least acknowledge the possibility. I think I've seen it more at conventions than on the net: since the person sees I'm a black female before I ask to show my portfolio to them. There's was definitely a change I noticed in most people after I presented my portfolio though. A good change, but still a change. But I think that may happen to anyone who shows they're more competent than the person initial assumed (considering how much they see at conventions, I'm fairly convinced they are a bit jaded at times when a person wants to show them their portfolio).

My clearest experience with sexism, where there was no doubt, lies with tattooing: I designed a modified version of the mexican "hecho en mexico" symbol for an older man who didn't speak english. When I finished, I was about to set up to tattoo him, but his friend who acted as a translator, politely told me that he wasn't comfortable with a woman tattooing him. I remember him looking apologetic himself. For their politeness, and my slight understanding of the generation the man was raised in, It didn't bother me too much.
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:iconyamicool:
yamicool Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I havent realy had much trouble with discrimination other than the fact I'm ginger. Seriously why is that a crime?

I have had the trouble that being a women its not easy to cosplay things with out the issue of sexulism- as with my issue of cleavage it dosn't leave alot of options. So I end up cosplaying as some digimon character that isn't all boobs DX. My flat mate and I had trouble when going to a convention and taking part in the Yu-Gi-Oh and Magic card games, as all the guys were like. Girls can't play card games! (didn't stop us trouncing them) You'd expect better from 20-30 year olds >.> its like primary school where boys say you can't like beast wars or dragon ball z. I find it irksome but I know theres worse out there.

At least at university in my graphic novels class everyone is a relative "nerd" of some sort. And I do get the "You play___?!?" and "You like____?!?" Oddly most lads don't think women play things like monster hunter, pokemon (dunno why) and final fantasy games. Never played anything online so can't say much about that. *shrug*
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:iconwisecrack-idiots:
Wisecrack-Idiots Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
Can I just hug you and say how awesome you are? You play Monster Hunter and Pokemon?
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:iconyamicool:
yamicool Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Yay a hug XD ironicaly it was one of my female friends who got me into monster hunter. loved pokemon since it started. When i've been to yugioh and pokemon get togethers i also notice the lack o girls. *shrug* maybe some don't like the competitve play?
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:iconwisecrack-idiots:
Wisecrack-Idiots Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012
Hugs for everyone! :la:

I first got hooked on Monster Hunter a few months prior to Tri's release. The Gamestop near my house was giving away the demo disc, and I absolutely fell in love with the hunting mechanics. I'm so pumped for 3 Ultimate's release. c:

Have you played the newest installments, White/Black 2? Yeah, I totally get where you're coming from. I've been a Pokemon junkie since the days of Red, Blue, and Yellow. Although I loved Yu-Gi-Oh cards and the show, I never got into much of the competitive play, although I did compete in the Pokemon metagame and tournaments. I dunno why more girls don't do competitive play either. *shrugs*
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:iconyamicool:
yamicool Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
I didnt have a psp for a while so got the wii one first then a second hand psp. hoping that the 3ds version is realeased in the UK.

I havent gone to any tornements as i'm either busy with University or they arnt anywhere local.
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:iconwisecrack-idiots:
Wisecrack-Idiots Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2012
Freedom Unite is for the psp, right? -> *is technologically handicapped if that weren't already painfully obvious*

I'm probably gonna get the WiiU version provided that there's a classic controller like there was for Tri. If not, 3ds, here I come!

Ahh. It's been a while for me too. I haven't done a tournament in a good year or two, I'm afraid. Hey, you could always round up some friends and do your own, right? Ooh, wait, I might actually try that now.
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:iconyamicool:
yamicool Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Heheheh, well my uni mates and I are making our own pokemon gym teams XD
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:iconwisecrack-idiots:
Wisecrack-Idiots Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012
Nice. xD
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(1 Reply)
:iconthemrbluesky:
TheMrBlueSky Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
I'm sexist against women because I see so many fake ones.
Now do I blame it on their genitals, or their upbringing, or really ANYTHING? No, I'm not interested in the why, I just alter my behavior based on the evidence.

From a purely Bayesian standpoint, I'm acting rationally when I don't trust a woman as much as a man, because I'm acting on my own personal experience, and that of my friend's(male AND female friends).

To throw a silly red herring emotional appeal into the mix: All of my closest friends are female. All of them. I trust them all dearly because they've proven to me that they're good people, and all I care about is that you're a good person. It's unfortunately just a little harder for you to prove to me that you're a good person if you're not a dangler.

And about that comic. The guy that is harassing the girl is a moron.
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:iconolms:
olms Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012
way to take what was meant to be a discussion for women to share their personal experiences and make it about yourself, good job
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:iconthemrbluesky:
TheMrBlueSky Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012
Sorry, I missed the "no boys allowed!! " sign at the door.
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:iconolms:
olms Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012
by all means, say whatever you want!! just know that no one cares about your betrayal problems in this particular forum and you sound like a tool.
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:iconthemrbluesky:
TheMrBlueSky Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012
Thanks. I'm a winch, actually, you stupid wench.
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:iconolms:
olms Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2012
oh, you
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:iconsomuchluv:
somuchluv Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I'm on a similar boat as Orbyss. I really can't think of any times when I've been discriminated against, but it's probably just because I'm assertive and not uber girly (I dress girly 50% of the time, neutral the other half).
I do get a lot of "What?! You play ____??", but after that everything goes fine. Being someone who goes to midnight openings, worked for an electronics store for two years and being an overall geek probably help as well.
I think the way you respond to "You play ___?" makes a difference as well as the way you bring up the game. "Dude, it's fucking awesome" comes off a lot better than giggling and squealing.

Idk, maybe I'm just lucky.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
Maybe it even comes down to location; perhaps difference schools, cities and countries have different gender expectations?
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:iconmellow-iris:
Mellow-Iris Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012  Student General Artist
I have experienced sexism. Mostly when playing online games, but not exclusively so.

Even from the age of 14-15 years of age. Boys got surprised when I admitted to being a girl, then getting defensive and rejecting the likelihood of an actual girl playing. Or getting flirty at once.
"There are no girls on the internet" was an well rehearsed phrase. Along with "get back to the kitchen","make me an sandwich" or "tits or gtfo". Things that got so standard that you almost stop reacting.
Several times i have had friends who became relay good friends until they realized I'm an girl and started flirting.

Some have asked cup size, looks ect. one even asked straight out if i had sex yet. Another said i was a "dud"(firecracker witch won't fire).
On X-box live they are even worse. Grouping up harassment against girls who "dares tread unto their domain".

In public I have been receiving unwanted attention, by bedonkadonk pinching. among others.
A "friend" thought it was ok to touch more private parts without preemption... Well he ain't my friend no more. (Same friend thought dating several women at the same time is an good idea).
Friends of a friend did the "get back to the kitchen","make me an sandwich" or "tits or gtfo" and was soo pleased with them self.
Father of an ex, pointed at a woman's private parts and said "son this is what you get if you give the woman beer"

Also all the other days were you get force fed gender specific things like "That girl is an slut! Look at how she dresses!", "Don't move outside after dark, you can be assaulted and raped" And more hidden messages and norms in society. How the genders are given gender specific attributes. And anyone who don't conform is an freak and shunned by both genders (generalizing a bit there).

Even my BF's friends was a bit awkward and didn't know what to do when i was playing halo with them. Because a girl can't play these kind of games?!... Well until it busted out a "HA! TAKE THAT YOU FUCKER!".
Overall i stopped telling my gender online, it only brings trubble.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
Interesting; do you think different games have different reactions to female players? Xbox live seems like it could be a bit of a sausage fest, as it were.
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:iconmellow-iris:
Mellow-Iris Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Student General Artist
I think when you have a more or less monotone group of individuals playing the same game they from a sort of agreement upon the correct group behavior.
Now this will not change unless you have someone tell them it's the wrong way to act, the problem here is that it's (most often) disregarded unless it's someone the group or individuals see as peers or superior.

So when you say have a larger group (say in mmo's like WoW). You have a more diverse player base, with more people from different places, age and upbringings. This means that in game; yes there are more jerks, but also more people to tell them what huge ass-hats they are.

Now compare this to xbox live, my experience is that it's more of the same age group of teens to people in their 20-30. They are used to the usual "smack talk" of some people. But since it's less girls (or they won't say they are) they react more aggressively towards those who show them self. It might be because of insecurity, or tension. I'm not so sure...
But there are less who say "Guys you are seriously being huge jerks right now". Not that i can say that it would work at once, but it shows a signal that this is not an accepted kind of behavior.

It might be the high competition aspect of a lot of the games (fps's in particular). Witch might make it different, since "no boy sees pride in being beaten by a girl".

The "Omg! You got beat by a girl!" comment is actually one of the things i pointed out to my BF. Now he is considered one of the gentlemen among guys. Who is all for equality in opportunities for everyone.
He looked surprised that i took that comment up, since he didn't see it as such a "big" deal, that his friends ect. reacted to it. And i pointed out even if it's even for teasing each other. The root of the taunt is that girls are lesser at games/ect. at a default. And i asked "Why do we need to prove our worth in our hobbies, when guys take it for granted the other males they play with plays for fun?"
I never got an satisfying answer.

Now it's kind of a huge rant and i don't know if it made much sense...

TLDR: Some games have more jerks, but you need more people telling them their jerks. Also "Beaten by a girl" taunts are stupid.

And i will leave this college humor sketch here: [link]
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:iconmellow-iris:
Mellow-Iris Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2012  Student General Artist
All tough the way of College humor is not the right way. It still puts things in perspective for some.
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:iconlothlorien-vampyre:
lothlorien-vampyre Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2012
I've been lucky on this front. I have a great group of friends, most of which are pretty "nerdy" in some form or another, that includes many other women. But that's not to say that I've gotten off completely untouched by gender bias. For the most part, I see it online. It isn't that I'm ostracized for being female, but that most people assume I'm male for the fact that I know what I'm talking about. Because, obviously, only men can know what they're talking about.

It has happened with my friends, though rarely. I occasionally play tabletop RPGs (I used to play more, and would again if I had the time). It surprises a lot of people to know that I've been part campaigns with entirely female groups. It's fine that it surprises people, but only to a point. Complete incredulity is a little insulting. Like they can't believe that an ENTIRE GROUP of women would want to play a tabletop game. (An odd tidbit about that: I've found that men roleplayers are more comfortable and willing than women -at least at first- to play the opposite gender. In a male dominated group I find myself always playing my own gender just for the fact that my character will be one of only a small number of women in the game, but in one memorable D&D campaign with my female group, my character was the only man o.O It made for a very interesting change of pace.)

When I am the only woman (or one of only a few) I am sometimes overlooked, both in and out of character. But to give my friends the benefit of the doubt, it's most likely due to me being a quiet, reserved person. It's hard for me to be heard when everyone is talking over everyone else. That isn't true of every mixed group I've been in, only the more boisterous ones.

Honestly, the worst discrimination I see isn't from being a woman, it's from being a gamer period. Unfortunately, this mostly comes from my dad, who has some... bigoted leanings. He doesn't understand or enjoy games, so he sees them as unworthy or stupid. He thinks they're just a waste of time... even as I find the hours he spends watching television equally pointless. The difference being that I don't look down on his choice in entertainment, but I can't say the same for him. (That isn't to say that my dad thinks I'm stupid and that I'm a lesser person or anything, he just doesn't get it and thinks that I could find a better hobby)
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:iconintricatevision:
IntricateVision Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012   Digital Artist
I'm not attractive enough to be called a 'fake nerd' lol (though that might be something to consider attractive equates to not-a-nerd?)
Though grant it I dunno if anyone's ever been called that. Never around me. I did have an interesting conversation some time ago about the lack of female interest in nerdom and 'nerdy' career paths opposed to the predominately male crowd. The objectification of women in games and comics. (coming off of a classmate's work being called 'fat' by industry professionals, and we had to discuss it because the model was of a women who might weigh 120 lbs) The expectations and development of men in our culture. It was pretty interesting discussion.

That said, I have been accused of not really liking comic books, because I don't much like super hero comics and tend not to read about Superman, Batman, Spiderman, etc. etc. And that my limited knowledge was proof that I was not a fan of comics.
I felt at the time, this had more to do with' Nerd Elitism' (i guess?) than it had to do with my being female. If they were suggesting I didn't like comics because of my chromosomes, it didn't come across.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
It is interesting, it certainly seems that conventionally beautiful women, or those who spend a deal of time on their outward appearance, suffer more incredulity or hostility. Perhaps males find more average looking women less threatening? Perhaps a beautiful woman on the scenes brings out some kind of defensive reaction.
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:iconintricatevision:
IntricateVision Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012   Digital Artist
Maybe!
It's hard to say really, but this is clearly time for a sociological experiment! Just have to think of one X)

I do think it may have something to do with the way women are marketed. You don't see women who are 'nerdy' (if you will) in the media. Or at least it's not the norm.
And nerd culture sort of has a 'cool kids club' vibe. If it's predominately male, and someone is just seeking the other, a female person might fill that position nicely.
It's just speculation here.

I'll have to observe this more, I'd hate to think this kind of sexism happens. Especially in a culture I am oft grouped into.
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:icondesignerflex:
DesignerFlex Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
I'm a guy so I really don't qualify for this question, however, I can say from the perspective of a guy who heavily dislikes sexism, I see it all around me. I see it literally but also subliminally. A lot of men do sexist things and don't even acknowledge or realize it is sexist.
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:iconcircuitdruid:
CircuitDruid Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
Intelligent female nerd-girl here. and yes, constantly :| Oddly the most bizarre case was not terribly negative. I was a wow player years ago and had a night elf druid.... and everyone assumed I was a male playing a female character. I'm talking 99% of the time until they heard my voice. That is bizarre.

In general however its just as the comic depicts. It's not really any one huge thing , just the exhaustion of having to do twice the work to prove your half the fan. You get tired of explaining yourself, so you stop.
Its a shame because it reduces the amount of people you can share the experience with, and have legitimate intelligent discussions with. For instance, I can talk to my sister for an hour about why I have legitimate beef with superman, but if I say 'god I really hate the superman movies' to a guy... well I'm just a girl Its not girly enough for me obviously. Not going to bother to enter the discussion. Opinion immediately invalidated.

Yeah, its exhausting.

Oh right, another time of note, was chatting in wow to a pair of guys about game mechanics, and the evolution of the game and how different game mechanics and even aesthetics had caused the community to evolve differently... great discussion, until one of the guys realized I was a girl, and immediately dismissed my opinion, and forced me to end the spirited debate I was having with the second guy by continuously interjecting with insulting and undermining remarks such as 'how long have you been playing games like this sweetheart?'
For the record, World of Warcraft is a fascinating example of ridiculous extremes in gaming culture. I don't think the guy realized what a beautifully ironic example he made of himself. Also for the record, for as long as they have been around sweetheart :P
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
I have heard of this 'exhausted' response from a number of female friends, where the sheer weight of the phenomenon causes a sort of shut down. It is a shame, because it seems to work in the mysogynists favor and effectively silences their opposition. However, one cannot fight all the time so I certainly understand.
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:iconcircuitdruid:
CircuitDruid Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2012
The solution is to find better people to hang out with ^.^ The way I see it the really loud and obnoxious people will be loud and obnoxious regardless. I'm far too feisty to be put down so easily when its important, but I don't have to butt heads with butheads constantly either. You learn to pick your battles, and I feel far better after posting a positive bit of writing about my stance and opinions in a blog or adding to a positive feminist discussion somewhere then I do after having a flame-match with some random guy.
That or one bottles it up and puts all ones repressed anger into art ^.^

What does make me worry though is the knowledge that not every lonely little nerd-girl has such a loving family and great friends to help them keep positive when arrogant little twerps are having their say, that's where the most damage is done. That kind of harassment does wear you down eventually if there's no-one to help you get back up, and that's what keeps me so feisty when thees sorts of issues come up.
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:iconartdoge:
ArtDoge Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Well yea there's fake fan boys and girls out there. When the Thor movie came out and EVERYONE was like yea it's the best but didn't know anything about the Destroyer armor or name any Celestials. But then again being an asian male with glasses, people automatically assume I'm the biggest calculator carrying, starcraft playing, terrible driver out there. We just tend to stick labels on anything before we read the fine prints. :)
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
Ha its true, but then is a bad thing to be a fake fan? It seems harmless.
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:icongodofimagination:
godofimagination Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
I'm not a woman, but I go to Dragoncon every year and my friend said all the strippers go there to dress up. I didn't believe him. Why would you wait in a five hour line and pay money just to do what you do at work but without pay? I know it's off topic but I just had to rant.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
I think the only stripers may be employed at the industry booths, when they hire so called 'booth babes' as promotional tools
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:icongodofimagination:
godofimagination Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012
He may have been just joking, but it still proves a point about the nature of that kind of discrimination. He's actually very smart and the best artist I know (he might have a booth there next year), so I didn't mean to paint him in a bad light.
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:iconviergacht:
Viergacht Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2012  Professional General Artist
On 'fake geek girls' - I've seen a lot of that posturing, quizzing and trying to denigrate other fans, but from my experience both males and females get it and it's being dished out by a certain kind of fan. I don't know if there's a label for that kind of behavior but it usually is a person who is very heavily invested in a certain fandom - has all the merch, knows a buttload of trivia, has met the actors or creators involved, usually has some sort of position of authority like they run a zine or a forum related to the fandom and has a lot of asskissers because of that. They get some sort of rush from putting other people down if they enjoy a fandom casually instead of to this religious degree. Obviously, not being female I can't speak to women getting hit with this sort of behavior _more_ than men, but I'm willing to bet if someone craves this sort of sense of superiority he probably treats women poorly in general even outside of fandom stuff. The fandom angle just makes it more obnoxious. And it seems to be a personality that crops up more in males than females, although I've seen women treating men this way on occasion.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2012
It is a common ape behaviour - social posturing. I think they are trying to elevate and secure their position within their culture, in this case a fandom, buy acting as a sort of gatekeeper, and keeping potential rivals down by constantly testing them.
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