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Kilnrunner by Abiogenisis Kilnrunner by Abiogenisis
The equator of Chri-Irah, baked to lethally high temperatures by its sun, has long presented a barrier to trade and communication between Northern and Southern Birrin cultures. Prior to the first Birrin civilisations’ destruction, the region could be easily traversed: Centuries later, a legacy of industrially derived carbon dioxide and other substances has cut off the emergent societies that survived the Collapse. It wasn’t until the rediscovery of the internal combustion engine that the first refrigerated ships crossed the equatorial ocean to re-establish contact. Wheeled vehicles, now with useful speed, were able to explore the Kiln at night, darting between safe houses dug deep into the cool desert bedrock.

However it took the re-discovery of powered flight to finally traverse the Kiln. Able to fly high enough to avoid the searing heat, early pressurised aircraft began hazardous day crossings to re-map the expanse. With little chance of rescue, the aircrews had to accept significant risk while also making their aircraft far more reliable. Indeed, it is largely due to the engineering necessities faced by these pioneers that later Birrin aircraft were so reliable.

Pictured here is one of the first dedicated Kiln runners, able to fly non-stop between airfields in the North and South to deliver people and cargo in a regular fashion. The three fuselages enabled heavy loads to be carried, the outer two being unpressurised and only suitable for cargo.

The two flight engines, mounted on the front of the cargo fuselages, are powerful in-line units each driving a contra-rotating propeller. Due to the lethal nature of the Kiln and to aid lifting off from short desert runways a supplementary engine is mounted on the rear passenger cabin: This engine, with its single folding airscrew, is used to assist takeoff and, perhaps more importantly, to supplement the main engines should one of them break down during flight.

Below this aircraft the desert is baking at an average temperature of eighty degrees Celsius, yet evidence that this was not always so abounds: A faint tracery of ancient roadways and industrial ruins dots the landscape and awaits re-discovery by future generations of Birrin.
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:iconartmaster543:
Artmaster543 Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2015  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Left guy: I'm turning left
Right guy: were turning right?
Left guy: no do not...
Right guy: OK, right it is.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2015
H-Bomb Hiccup 
Reply
:iconartmaster543:
Artmaster543 Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2015  New Deviant Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Lol. Exactly that.
Reply
:iconsmoketh:
smokeTH Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
This is not gonna fly. AT ALL. 
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2015
Why not?
Reply
:iconsmoketh:
smokeTH Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
*tests in kerbal space program* hm...well. Color me impressed. It actually flies. A bit crappy though:
1. no vertical tailwing to lean it and force nose on course. 
2. Wings are too small (not by the sweep but by the length along body) - you need to keep your engines on full throttle all the time to compensate for small lift. Also because of that - when you try doing battle turn (lean 90 degrees, pull up) it constantly results in stall. 
3. With only fuelbody being in front of pilot - center of lift matches center of mass, which is terrible because craft gonna be flipped all the time - prolonging that towards the nose partially negates the problem, BUT, still not enough distance between the two. 
Here are flight screenshots.
www.dropbox.com/sh/qhekgezz4p1…
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2015
I was thinking it could use the same system flying wings use to maintain a straight course, maybe split ailerons.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2015
Interesting. Will slap a rudder on the next one :)
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:iconsmoketh:
smokeTH Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Can't do that - you need straight surface for such a thing. when you have multiple bodies providing points of air dispersion rather than one prolonged surface - it is more likely that craft nose will be turned left/right via incoming air stream. 
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:iconinkthelife:
InktheLife Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2015  Student General Artist
WOW:)
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:iconorionshipworks:
OrionShipworks Featured By Owner May 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Cool looking aircraft. And the story is really intriguing!
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner May 22, 2014
Thanks :D
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:icond-mounty:
D-Mounty Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2014
Burt Rutan called, he needs a ride back to his home on Chri-Irah.
Reply
:iconocallaghandesing:
OcallaghanDesing Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014
naboo fighter crossed with a P-38
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2014
Wow--an alien airplane. It looks so much like ours though--convergent engineering?
Reply
:iconsnowmonk:
SnowMonk Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Yes. Simply everything about this is fantastic.
Love the image and the story.

Very Nice.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2014
Thanks, I LOVE aviation design :)
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:iconkitsch1984:
Kitsch1984 Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2014  Professional General Artist
Very very original!!! Future that never was!
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2014
Burt Rutans future :P
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:iconsynaesthetic1:
Synaesthetic1 Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2013
The post-industrial equatorial hell as a result of industrial gasses is a brilliant and insightful idea.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2013
Cheers, I find the idea rather evocative myself.
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:iconaltair75:
Altair75 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2013   Photographer
Yes!

Those turbo-prop engines are awesome, especially sound from them!  OMG! I can't contain my excitement!

Clearly one of my favorites!
Great back story!Love 

I can imagine what it would be like 80 degree dry air of Klin, in addition to radiant heat from the sun.

And as always, great work Alex! :D (Big Grin) 
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2013
Lots of heat shimmer, baked clay and dead old cities.
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:iconaltair75:
Altair75 Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2013   Photographer
However, even if the hot humid air feels hotter than hot dry air, radiant heat is the worst. :toohot: 
So it's not the same thing as to be in the sauna.
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:iconmaulermech:
MaulerMech Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
Looks awesome! Remember that it's the rear wings that should be a bit bigger - otherwise, pitch up tendency would rise with lift coefficient, leading to unstable aircraft. :)
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
Yeah, I did read somewhere that symmetrical front and rear wings can cause lift problems...
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:iconmaulermech:
MaulerMech Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013

Oh, tandem wings are really, really complex , I'm working on them right now. Nobody's an expert on everything, and I'm certainly not the art person. :)

If you have some aircraft questions (now or in future), please ask! :)


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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2013
Cheers, will do :)
Reply
:iconjarm13:
JARM13 Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
While I'm not sure the aircraft could really fly it certainly looks like it should fly . Great picture and a really good back story . Thanks for sharing the picture and story . Is there an adventure story in the works ? Someone should write a SciFi story based on this .
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2013

Actually I would rather like to make an RC version, to see if it would work :P

 

There are stories at work, could take a few years ;)

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:icondarkaiz:
Darkaiz Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Very awesome indeed. I like both the picture and the text :D
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2013
Cheers ;)
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:iconaconnoll:
aconnoll Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Whoa! This is mad!
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:iconaditya2:
Aditya2 Featured By Owner May 10, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
What does the Birrin planet look like from orbit? And plz draw what it looks like from orbit.
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:iconkrazykidfannumber1:
krazykidfannumber1 Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013
what was The Collapse?
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2013
A combination of warfare and climate change that caused the destruction of industrial society.
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:iconthegranadian:
TheGranadian Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Kinda retrofuturistic. Outstanding work!
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:iconrozniy:
rozniy Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2013
I can't quite figure out if this is a pusher plane or the other way round. Which is the front end? Otherwise, great job!
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2013
Front end has the twin props :)
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:iconbrentogara:
BrentOGara Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Amazing and beautiful... I love all the little details you put into the Birrin's world. The aircraft is lovely, and I really like the idea of the third engine with folding blades kept in reserve. Post-apocalyptic civilizations are my favorite... but I have to say, the specific apocalypse you chose is disappointingly anti-climatic (pun intended ;)) Antoine de Saint-Exupéry would have agreed that carrying a spare engine while flying over a desert is a very good thing. :D
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2013
I feel like the apocalypse is realistic, and i really like the idea of hope after one. I am not drawn to stories where the world really does end.
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:iconbrentogara:
BrentOGara Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, the climate-change apocalypse is probably the most likely to actually occur, which is why it bothers me... Here on Earth, we've had (roughly in order) One oxygen-poisoning apocalypse, several apocalypses of unknown (but likely climatological) causes, one asteroid-impact apocalypse, several ice-age apocalypses, we came really close to a nuclear apocalypse recently, and we may well be several decades (maybe even a few centuries) into the beginning of another climatological apocalypse... so seeing you choose "Climatological Apocalypse" was kind of... "oh, this again.

Not that you have to be totally original in everything you do... but I'm a cainotophile, so I like to see new things from time to time... almost constantly, really :P

Now, having hope that life can go on after a really bad climatological apocalypse is good... It'd be a pretty boring story if you went post-apocalyptic and everything had died. Although you could write a bit of flash fiction about how the wind blows ceaselessly, and maybe something about and endless stream of sunrises and sunsets over the increasingly weathered ruins. There's mounting evidence that the current (most probably) sterile state of Mars is due to runaway climate change that resulted in an unsurvivable apocalypse... I just hope no-one was living there at the time. :(

Anyway, I'm sure you'll write what you like, and I'll be sure to read it! :D
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013
What are some cool apocalyptic scenarios you have come across?
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:iconbrentogara:
BrentOGara Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, my favorite is the one where humanity is the creation of ancient beings with God-like powers, and they, or another of their creations, come to destroy/harvest the human race. That one has so many possible variations (from the traditional Christian "Rapture" to Lovecraft's "Cthulhu Mythos" to Bungie's "Halo", to Ridley Scott's "Prometheus") that you can really make it your own while keeping the 'resonance' that makes it so popular.

Cosmological accidents is another good one, with guys like Stephen Baxter and Greg Bear writing whole series of novels based on all the ways the universe might destroy us purely by accident, and then you have the stories where a human-initiated cosmic accident is the cause, because we do so love to meddle in things which we truly do not understand.

I have to admit, that an apocalypse initiated by a non-native source would be almost impossible to survive. If we're going to get through this with any kind of breeding-population/society even reasonably intact, it's probably going to be something we did to ourselves.

An excellent case in point: The Black Death in Eurasia VS Smallpox in America.

The outbreak of Black Death in 14th century Europe is regularly pointed out as the most deadly/destructive plague to ever hit mankind (it's not even close). It killed between 1/3 and 1/2 of the European population, and set off a long string of societal changes that culminated in the Renaissance and the formation of the modern nation-state (not to mention modern society as a whole). Despite the terrible toll it took at the time (estimates vary between 75 and 200 million people), the end results of the Black Death actually make it one of the best things that ever happened to the human race.

The (purely accidental) introduction of Smallpox into the native American population in the 16th century makes the Black Death look like an upset tummy at a country picnic. Smallpox killed nineteen out of every twenty people in South America, and somewhere between nine out of ten up to nineteen out of twenty people in Central and North America, depending mostly on family(tribal) genetics. Where the Black Plague left society and technology intact, and spurred forward the development of both, Smallpox destroyed any semblance of society or technology by wiping out such a large percentage of the population that no-one was left to have a society or use technology.

Due to the fast growth of tropical flora, the modern world didn't even know that the South American civilizations even existed at all until discoveries in the last two decades proved conclusively that somewhere between 180 and 250 million people had lived in South America until Smallpox wiped them out, almost to the last individual. The few who survived were so devastated that their descendants live a hunter-gatherer lifestyle today, with only the barest rudiments of society or technology. Central and South America fared better, due to higher levels of immunity, but even there the true extent of their population and technology is still being discovered, with population estimates and technology levels being driven ever-upward by each new find. The death-toll for Smallpox starts at 200 million, and only goes up from there, while the impact it had on the native societies is incalculable.
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:iconthebashorguy:
thebashorguy Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013
Beautiful lines. I love the concept. I would absolutely love to see more of this aircraft!
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:iconbear48:
bear48 Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2013  Professional
very nice job
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
Danke :)
Reply
:iconthetyler101:
TheTyler101 Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2012
You know what really appeals to me in this picture? It's how you could have described it as a human aircraft, an I would have totally believed you. My biggest gripe with a lot of si-fi is how oddly different alien technology is from ours. I understand how there tech is more advanced and they have different visual styles in engineering, but some shapes are just more efficient than others.
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:iconabiogenisis:
Abiogenisis Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2012
I think people have a tendency to think alien = organic. In reality they may have to use the same engineering ideas we do.
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2012
I saw this report [link] and thought of this painting. Way to predict reality! :)
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